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It’s good to have a cardigan when it’s cold – or a mug of hot cocoa

I believe a cardigan sweater is the adult version of a teddy bear. It’s warm and snuggly, giving one that warm-fuzzy feeling we all crave from time to time. Cozy but not overbearing, if you’ll pardon the pun. On a cold grey day, I love wearing a cardigan.

Of course most things we love have to do with memories. I suppose my love for cardigans goes back to my teen years.

I grew up with a fascination for the 50’s, it having been the decade when my parents were kids. I heard all kinds of stories and saw all the old movies about bobby-socks-ers and their letter-sweater boyfriends. Girls either wore these cute finely knit cardigans that were part of a sweater set, or they wore the over-sized chunky cardigan given to them by an athlete wooing them. My first impression of sexy was the coquettish look those pony-tailed teens had in these outfits.

sweater set crowd

I was always torn between trying to fit in and wanted to feel comfortable in my own skin. I didn’t figure out until my 30’s that I’m one of those people who was not meant to fit in, but rather to stand out. (You’d think the horizontally striped socks I wore would have clued me in, but no.) There was one place I knew I could find comfort though – the kitchen.

Cooking has always warmed my heart and my soul as well as my tummy. But sometimes you need a quick fix rather than hours of putzing around. A mug of hot cocoa is the best quick fix I know.

Nestle Quik chocolate drinkAs a kid, warming up a bit of milk with a heaping spoonful of Kwik was good enough, but then I developed my palate and became a gourmand. I travelled to Europe and discovered steamed hot cocoa in Paris. Then I found nirvana at breakfast one morning in Barcelona when I sipped on an elixir that was akin to warm chocolate pudding. Needless to say, my Quik days were over.

When I returned from Europe and got ready for university away from home, I wanted to be independent but still feel connected to home. My Dad gave me one of his cardigans to keep warm in the damp Vancouver climate. It was a bit like having a teddy bear, or a cape with super powers that made me feel safe.

Nowadays you can buy mixes that have definitely stepped up a notch or two from the Quik of my childhood. And artisan hot cocoa from chocolatiers is a popular take-home item.

I like to buy chocolate from Thomas Haas in Vancouver. When I get to the city his cafes are at the top of the list of places to stop. There is nothing like dunking one of his flaky croissants in a mug of his deliciously rich hot chocolate. But there is something wonderfully decadent about being able to make this kind of hot chocolate at home.

Homemade authentic hot cocoa is very simple. Here are my proportions for 1 cup (250 mL). I like to use whole milk. Please just don’t try this with water.

Spanish hot cocoa

Method 1 – with chocolate

  • Heat milk in a pot, or steamer. Measure 5 tablespoons (2-1/2 oz or 70 g) of dark chocolate (55-70% cacao) into your cup, in small pieces or grated. Whisk chocolate and milk until blended. If desired, add a sprinkle of cinnamon or a bit more grated chocolate on top.

Method 2 – with cocoa

  • Rinse a small pot with cold water (this helps keep the milk from scalding in the pot).
  • Sift together 2 tablespoons cocoa, 1/4 teaspoon corn starch and if desired, 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon or ginger.
  • Pour 1 cup of milk into the pot, and stir in 1 tablespoon honey. Stir in the cocoa mix and heat to medium-high, stirring constantly until bubbles form and a gentle boil starts. (you have to get the liquid to a boil for the cornstarch to react.)

Either way, I like to top my homemade hot cocoa with vanilla ice cream, not marshmallows. You know how they say, “Go big or go home”? Well, why not go big at home?!

I have had a few sweater sets in my day, although I discovered the matching type of look was not really me (it’s more for those who really do fit in). But I do still have Daddy’s wool sweater, which I wear every so often with a jaunty scarf and sometimes a hat. It still makes me feel special, and a smile comes over my face every time as old memories come back. The same thing happens when I sip a good cup of hot cocoa.

KPL with Daddy's sweater

How to chase away a winter cold

chicken noodle soup can

Did your Mom like to quote platitudes about staying healthy when you were a kid? You know, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away!” and “Early to bed, early to rise, keeps a man healthy, wealthy and wise.” I always wondered how the secret to a long and healthy life could be so simple, but apparently there is one saying that does work well:

Starve a fever, feed a cold.

Since I have had a winter cold every year since my sinuses were affected by jaw surgery as a teenager I can tell you that even if you don’t think this works to cure you, it will make you feel a bit better. Chicken soup might be great for your soul; it’s even better for clogged sinuses and a sore throat.

sick - tissuesMy favourite recipes when I have a cold are boldly flavoured foods, I think because it’s hard to taste when my nose is all stuffed up. There is also scientific research that says hot foods when you are cold help boost your system (conversely, cold foods with a fever help cool you down). It’s also important to stay hydrated when you are sick, so liquids of any kind are crucial and water gets boring fast.

  • Porridge is the way I start the day when I’m a sickie, seasoned with cinnamon and vanilla and jazzed up with a handful of dried cranberries for some extra vitamin C. Drizzle some maple syrup over top to cheer your spirits, and get the boost from the natural sugars. Click the link for even more ideas from Jamie Oliver – who better than a bonafide Englishman!
  • Hot & Sour Soup works wonders, even better than regular chicken soup. My recipe is a simple one; it kept me alive as a starving student! If you want more solid food than soup, then my recommendation is a grilled cheese sandwich, with multiple cheeses and caramelized onions – and bacon, if you feel up to it.
  • Garlic is a famous remedy for many things, and rosemary is an old favourite in curing respiratory problems, so if you’re up to eating a full meal, go for a rosemary-rubbed roast with some garlic mashed potatoes.
  • I have an Icelandic tea that is very tasty with honey and the blend of herbs in it – angelica, sweet cicely, chervil and Northern dock) are an old Icelandic remedy for colds (who can argue with one’s ancestors?)
  • Mexican hot chocolate is a nice switch for the endless cups of tea, and the spice is supposed to help clear your system of toxins too. I like Ina Garten’s recipe so that is the link I offer for you.
  • Ice cream is a great way to soothe a sore throat, and if you add hot fudge or caramel sauce you’ll feel even better… it’s a good substitute for having Mom around to look after you 🙂

sick in bedIf you’re reading this sick in bed, I hope this helps. If you’ve made it through to the other side, bookmark this page for the next bout of illness to cheer you up!

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