Monthly Archives: May 2017

Quality time

Sundays are for quality time. Time with family and friends, alone time – time to regenerate. That’s what Sunday dinner is all about. 

We had the perfect combination of quality and convenience this Sunday. A few slices of slow cooked prime rib reheated to perfection with some twice-cooked baby potatoes made for a decadent dinner with a bit of green salad. 

Good old fashioned meat and potatoes!


Thankfully I had a wee bit of something meaty in the cellar (you have to love local talent) :

Spierhead Pursuit 2010 – a delicious #bcwine pairing with the beef


And that’s all. My time was spent offline today. It’s good to check out once in a while. Can we all toast to that?

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How to brighten a green thumb

I haven’t been able to do as much in my garden as I would like this spring. It’s too cold and wet. The ground is cold for the plants and the wind is cold for me. So, to cheer myself up I went to the nursery. 

This might sound like backwards behaviour but I felt better as soon as I got there. I could smell the fresh cut flowers. I chuckled at the whimsical garden statues (who wouldn’t love to have a smirking dragon lying in their grass?). It was drizzling as I headed to the tables of plants under tarps; not many souls except me and a few foul weather friends. 


I was inspired with a few new ideas, and made notes for a future visit on what I wanted to plant. 

In the end I splurged on a few plants I needed to replace – lemon verbena, globe basil and an heirloom beefsteak tomato. They were ones that are hard to find and they should be happy in my greenhouse for the next week or so.  Just for fun I decided to include a few geraniums that will be my salute to Canada’s sesquicentennial. 


I almost skipped up to the exit with my finds, and I hummed on the way home. It was still drizzling but I didn’t care. My green thumb was definitely brighter. 

Strawberry Moonlight 

TGIF. It’s a full moon tonight and the Farmers Almanac says June is all about roses and strawberries so that’s what it’s called. I like the idea of a moon with a pink tint. Is that like seeing the world through rose coloured glasses, I wonder?


The garden is growing and the days are getting longer. The sun is heating things up and the farmers markets are getting busier. My soul always swells this time of year.

The radishes I planted last Sunday have already sprouted ! And did you notice my spiffy new row sign?

My microgreens are looking good – wild arugula, mâche, cilantro and cress.

Tucking in the greenhouse peppers, basil and token tomato for the night. “Snug as a bug in a rug”.

 

This is also the last weekend I have to sit back and soak in all this beauty and wonder. So, I intend to do just that. I wish you a wonderful weekend, with good food, wine and company. Cheers!

Chocolate and Nuts, in a New Way

Chocolate and peanut butter. Some people aren’t crazy about the combination, but most North Americans love it. It could be argued that this is the best example of a truly original American taste.

Did you know that Mr. H.B. Reese invented the chocolate covered peanut butter cup? Yes, there really was a Mr. Reese. And guess what? He worked for Hershey’s before he left to create his own candy company in the 1920’s. Apparently the one condition Hershey’s had for him when he left was that he buy all his chocolate from them. How about that!

Even today, almost one hundred years after this unique confection was created, it is still the best selling candy in America. Hershey’s bought the company in the 1960’s but the Reese name still sticks. Even the increase in people allergic to peanuts has not slowed their popularity.

I am a big fan of chocolate and peanut butter together. Peanut butter cookies with chocolate chips are more than a bit better, they are close to nirvana. Chocolate peanut butter ice cream, if well made, should probably be illegal. But I had never made an actual candy with chocolate and nut butter.

To be fair, the recipe I used was for cashew butter with chocolate. It’s good, but next time I’m going to use peanut butter. My brain tasted the finished product and I could hear it saying inside my head, “it’s fine, but it would be just that much better if it was the real thing.”

I’ll let you decide. Perhaps you are allergic to peanuts. Since cashews are a tree nut, they might be a good alternative. You can easily leave out the pomegranate seeds in this recipe, too – add dried cranberries instead if you like, or nothing. Power Bark is good even if you make it with just the chocolate and the nut butter. Just sayin’.

 

New Month, New Start

Today is May Day, a celebration in many parts of the world – some countries have made it a workers day, and others have it as a celebration of spring, an evolution of pagan festivals such as Beltane. I am always struck by nature’s timeline on this day, perhaps because I live in Canada where the winter weather likes to linger.

It seems this year I am leaning more to the other side of May Day’s meaning – I need help to get out of my winter funk. I was in the garden this morning with my fingers in the dirt and that was a good tonic but wearing two woolly layers and still having my gumboots dampened my mood, if you’ll pardon the pun. My Lilies of the Valley have come up, but are far from blooming yet this year, so there will be no real “Fête du Muguet” for me.

The naval term “mayday” was created in 1923 by a British radio operator who came up with an easily recognizable phrase (he was inspired by the French “m’aider”, meaning “help me”). It is repeated 3 times when calling for help, to make sure everyone hears it correctly. It seems to me that wouldn’t be too hard in disastrous situations; one has a tendency to shout and repeat things. When the clouds get low and the wind blows day after day I feel like I should run out in the yard and send out this call.

I suppose a better way to deal with our long winter is to engage in the celebration of moving forward, though. I flipped the calendar pages and I will be planting the last of my greenhouse seedlings today. I will bake a pound cake to signify the sweeter time of summer with sunshine and warmth. (Historically, this was when grazing animals were put out to pasture to feed on the wild grasses and flowers, making butter and milk richer and more flavourful.)

I’ve always wanted to dance under a Maypole, but that will take some more work. There is something romantic and wistful about maidens in flowing dresses dancing with ribbons barefoot in the grass. Maybe I’ll put together a fairy garden. No one will notice if I tiptoe out tonight to dance with the little ones and have my own Beltane ritual.

The Fairy Dance (1875) – Richard Doyle

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