Monthly Archives: February 2016

Jamaican Foodie Paradise

Whenever my husband Martin and I go on holidays, we are excited to try new food experiences. The last few years in Jamaica we have been lazy and relegated our enthusiasm to within the walls of the resort. We did enjoy trying local fruits, and traditional dishes like curried goat, jerk chicken and gizzadas (coconut tarts), but this year I wanted to kick things up a notch and rub elbows with some local foodies. I did an online search and found Zimbali Retreat, iPhone download Feb 22 2016 430a small property in the hills above Negril that offered a demo cooking class and tour of their organic farm garden. It seemed right up our alley! I was excited and invited a couple we know who are also foodies. They had shared our Vegas experiences so I figured they would like this taste of Jamaica. We had no idea just how much fun we were going to have…

We arrived at the gate after a bumpy ride up a narrow road that bordered sugar cane plantations and an old stone church.   iPhone download Feb 22 2016 427Martin was afraid we were going to have to carry the car or abandon it if the potholes got any bigger or the road got any narrower. The sugar cane stalks knocked along the side of the car as we drove through plantation land, and as we mounted the hill a local dog lying at the edge of the road didn’t even look up. It was only a half hour drive, but I felt as though I’d been transported to another place.  A short walk down a palm-covered pathway revealed mahogany beams that covered a cozy kitchen and airy sitting room, all overlooking the farm below. I felt a bit like I was visiting the Swiss Family Robinson on their deserted island! We were served a refreshing sorrel ginger drink while we cooled off. Just as we finished our last sip our tour guide arrived.

Clifford, who has been at Zimbali since the beginning (9 years ago), led us over much of the 6 acre terrain, stopping every hundred steps or so to show us another plant, most of which provided some benefit for the kitchen. We saw banana and coconut trees, pineapple plants, Caribbean oranges and grapefruits, June plums, star fruit, lemongrass, annatto, turmeric and ginger roots, breadfruit, all kinds of pumpkins and zucchini squash, beans, and then the crowning glory – noni fruit. This fruit is highly regarded as having great healing powers; the juice is said to be a cure-all. The bees on the farm love it too, said Clifford. Noni bloosom honey is his favourite.

Clifford showed us the right way to crack open a coconut (hit the 3 corners of the outer shell), and he told us about using cinnamon leaves in cooking. We learned that the bark of the mahogany trees was used to make the rich reddish-brown dye still common in Caribbean textiles. He showed us the massive African tulip trees taking over wild sections of the jungle, and how the rain brings on mango season (in May), when the fruit is so plentiful it sits in piles by side of the roads! The gardener in me was trying valiantly to remember everything he said as I tasted and smelled and strained my neck to see in every direction, absorbing every detail.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 437

a June plum tree, with the blossoms that will turn into the refreshing tangy fruit often used for juice

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 436

here Clifford showed us the mahogany tree. One of the staff is returning to the kitchen with oranges.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 449

work on the terraced section of the garden, where squash and bananas are being planted

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 443

annatto seeds from an achiote bush, used in cooking to impart colour and a slightly nutty & peppery taste.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 453

fresh turmeric root – from that brown patch. They grow ginger too, in the same way.

the noni tree, a source of great nutrients. Sometimes called uglifruit.

Martin smelling fresh lemon grass

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 440

did you know banana trees only grow one stem of bananas? Then another tree starts beside it for the next batch of fruit.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 442

pineapple plants take 10 months to grow a mature fruit

 

 

 

On our return from the tour we met the owners of the resort, Alecia & Mark. Alecia grew up in these hills, and learned much from her grandfather about the land and its secrets. She is a Rastafarian and has been all her life. Mark grew up in a military family and his travels as a youth gave him a desire for understanding cultures and experiencing life on a more simple scale. Both of them are “living the dream”, existing almost off the grid with solar power and the harnessing of rain water, not to mention that the farm provides about 70% of their food. This is not just an agritourism resort, it is a lifestyle, and their passion and sense of inner peace is evident when you talk with them.

We returned to the lodge dripping in sweat from the humidity. It didn’t matter. A quick splash of water on my face and a few sips of water and I was ready to get to the kitchen. Zimbali’s two chefs, Raymond and Rudolph,  were already hard at work of course, and their counter was almost overflowing with the bounty from the farm. We were truly spoiled as it was only us and our friends there that day. We saddled up to the bar to watch, learn and eat.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 459

the bounty awaits! fresh farm veggies on the kitchen counter

The first course was a breaded fritter that was juicy and delicate, green in colour. It was served with an escovitch, a Jamaican pickle made with onions & peppers in a chili vinegar brine.  Raymond asked us to guess what kind of vegetable he had used on the fritter and we thought we had it – zucchini! Nope, he said, guess again. It was the person in the group who is least a foodie who nailed it – green tomatoes. Not as firm as our green tomatoes and not as tangy, rather velvety soft and slightly sweet in contrast to the pickle. The sorrel reduction that garnished the plate was the crowning glory, refreshing and tart.

fried green tomatoes, Jamaican style

fried green tomatoes, Zimbali style

The next course was a sort of cake, like a crab cake but made with vegetables again, said Rudolph. Again we were stumped – cassava? No. Yam? (They had real yams as well as sweet potato on the counter, two very different things, and both used often in a Jamaican kitchen. Sweet potatoes are orange, yams are white – more fibery, not as sweet.) No. They gave us a few hints and we finally figured out it was cauliflower. It tasted much richer than I imagined cauliflower ever could, and was served with a banana purée and a sort of tropical succotash of corn, peppers and tropical fruit. It was delectable.

cauliflower cake with tropical succotash

cauliflower cake with tropical succotash

We were able to choose our main course, and I picked jerk shrimp, while Martin chose escovitch fish. Our friends had curried shrimp. They were all intensely flavoured and beautifully tender, and were served with a quick coleslaw, veggies in a seasoned coconut milk and a green plantain and banana rosti (shredded and pan-fried in a patty). Everything was prepared as we watched, even the coconut milk – we saw the coconut opened, the meat cut out and then shredded in the food processor, and the milk squeezed through a strainer.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 467

my Jerk shrimp, with banana & plantain rosti, coleslaw and veggies in coconut curry

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 466

Rudolph & Raymond plate the main course

But wait, there was dessert too! I groaned under the weight of lunch, but my enthusiasm kicked in. How could I miss out on a slice of Raymond’s banana rum cake with caramelized melons & papaya? The cake had no eggs but was not heavy, rather silky with a hint of Jamaican spices (allspice, ginger, nutmeg). Raymond explained that he had long ago mastered baking without eggs, as he doesn’t eat them himself. His skill was evident in the finesse of the final product. It was the perfect end to a real gourmand afternoon.

Raymond's rum cake

Raymond’s rum cake

We hugged the chefs to show our appreciation and thanked our hosts profusely for their hospitality, all wishing we could return to stay and soak up the relaxing vibe. (I think on my next visit I might like to stay and experience a massage, yoga class, and a Rasta Tour!)

We hardly noticed the bumps in the road on the way back, being lulled into a sense of total relaxation after our retreat visit. Rain drummed on the car windows as the scenery went by in a blur. By the time we returned to our resort I had my second wind and was happy to tell anyone who would listen (and a few who didn’t seem to care) about what fun we had. I felt I had sampled a true taste of the tropics along with a healthy dose of Jamaican hospitality and respect, and having enjoyed it I was proudly displaying my enthusiasm like it was a diploma of achievement.

iPhone download Feb 22 2016 473

#OscarsSoWhite #FoodSoDiverse

red carpet

Okay, I’m taking advantage of controversy to get your attention. I do believe that food can help people to calm down and take a breath, though; sitting around a common table partaking of a meal is a good time for discussion. We learn other people’s points of view. The news about the upcoming Oscars being “so white”, that is, not having any nominees who are black – it is worthy of serious consideration. I don’t think that a specific colour is the issue, but rather that colour of any kind should not be part of the discussion, just like gender shouldn’t. The only reason I like the idea of Best Actress and Best Actor categories is that it offers a chance to recognize two performances. But we don’t give an award for Best Female Director and Best Male Director, or Best Film with Women and Best Film with Men, so why do we need to differentiate?

multicultural world of hands

Oscars Governors Ball 2016Thankfully, food doesn’t seem to end up in this pitfall often. Wolfgang Puck is preparing the Governor’s Ball for the 22nd year in a row, and he has a plethora of dishes for people to taste, with many flavours and backgrounds.

In an effort to bring together the many sides in this argument, I thought I would offer a few menu suggestions for Oscar night celebrations that featured a range of food from various cultures and countries. Perhaps I could encourage people to look past borders in the same way we should look past the mirror when we see people. They are all people, and this is all food. Beyond that, it’s just meant to be enjoyed, and savoured.

How about an international menu? You know, small plates from around the world, in celebration of all the countries that make great movies and have wonderful stories…

  • Spanish tapas, like chorizo & prawn skewers or a Spanish tortilla of potatoes & onions… and a bit of Sherry of course
  • Italian antipasto, like warm olives with some capicollo and Asiago… and maybe a glass or two of Prosecco  bubbly toast
  • French canapés, like cheese straws made from puff pastry and cherry tomatoes stuffed with salmon mousse… and a lovely aperitif like Lillet
  • Indian street food, like samosas and pakoras with some mango and tamarind chutneys for dipping… and a bit of Gewurztraminer to wash it down
  • British nibbles, like mini “jacket potatoes” filled with sour cream and chives or slices of roast beef with horseradish mustard on toast points… you could save the Port for later in the evening
  • Hungarian sausages with a paprika mayonnaise for dipping… and a refreshing Pilsener
  • German pickled white asparagus wrapped in ham… with a lager, or do you prefer a Doppelbock?  beer toast
  • Scandinavian smorgasbord items, like smoked salmon on dark rye or pickled herring or Swedish meatballs … and a bit of Aquavit for toasting?
  • Asian bites, like wontons and spring rolls or maybe just a platter of freshly made sushi… with sake, because why not?

Or perhaps we should stick to North America, more in the range of “comfort food”:

  • BBQ ribs, slow cooked to perfection? would we have to argue about what kind of sauce they had?
  • chicken wings – we could have some hot, some teriyaki, some salt & pepper… but we have to include the celery sticks and blue cheese dip
  • a cheese ball? or is that too corny? or maybe designer grilled cheese is better
  • corny, that reminds me – we need to have chips and salsa!
  • Okay, seriously now, how about quesadillas, and pulled pork sliders, and lobster rolls and salad wraps?  wine food sample plate
  • If we wanted something more Canadian for fans in the Great White North, we could offer salmon jerky, fresh oysters, Alberta beef in mini Yorkshire pudding, prairie chicken drumettes in saskatoon berry sauce, Winnipeg goldeye on bagel slices, poutine (of course) and grilled scallops with fruit salsa… not to mention there’s plenty of wine and craft beer to choose from

Even with food it’s easy to fall into a stereotype of what one expects to experience; meanwhile chefs and home cooks around the world are busy knocking down the walls of tradition all the time.It is possible to celebrate history and at the same time look forward in appreciation of the innovations that came later. Sometimes there is a natural evolution to things getting better, and other times we have to think and learn from our mistakes. British food for some means overcooked roast and bland mushy veg, but that is not the case in most places anymore. By the same token I think we can work to make sure that an evening like the Academy Awards night recognizes good work, regardless of where the work came from or what kind of person (or gender or colour) created it.

I for one will still be watching, as I want to remember the many excellent memories I had in theatres this year. I want to spend an evening celebrating with my movie-going partner and soulmate. Perhaps we’ll make a list of our own and toast our very own winners. And we will continue to look for good movies to see, just like we look for new kinds of food to enjoy. A good job deserves to be appreciated, always.

multicultural word cloud

%d bloggers like this: